Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Politics

Q. But then you were unexpectedly offered a job.

A. My tutor at Cambridge had heard about a job in political research and recommended me without my knowledge. Suddenly, stuck in the middle of Chapter Seven, I get a letter asking me to an interview.

Q. And they offered you a job. Had you taken an interest in politics before?

A. Not really. But it took me right into the centre of the political system. A wonderful opportunity. So I figured I'd try it, and work on the book at week-ends.

Q. You did two research jobs in fact, for different parties. Was it interesting?

A. Very. Some of the people I worked with were planning to go into politics, or political journalism. It gave one a big insight into the process.

Q. But you didn't think of a political life for yourself?

A. Maybe once or twice. But most of the time, though the work itself was fascinating, I kept thinking: "This would make a good story", or "there's a character for a novel some day." I couldn't help it.

Q. You kept writing?

A. Some articles for The Spectator magazine. Another novel, taken to an agent but not accepted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Hard to believe, but this month of April is the 50th anniversary of the 'official' break-up of the Beatles. This author was a very timid young student at Cambridge then. But the far more worldly and talented guy who had the room across the corridor from me had a lovely girlfriend who worked for John Lennon; and one day they scooped me up and took me to Lennon's house at Ascot. The white house with the white piano. Lennon himself wasn't there, but all the same . . . Fifty years later, that day is still so vivid




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