Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Politics

Q. But then you were unexpectedly offered a job.

A. My tutor at Cambridge had heard about a job in political research and recommended me without my knowledge. Suddenly, stuck in the middle of Chapter Seven, I get a letter asking me to an interview.

Q. And they offered you a job. Had you taken an interest in politics before?

A. Not really. But it took me right into the centre of the political system. A wonderful opportunity. So I figured I'd try it, and work on the book at week-ends.

Q. You did two research jobs in fact, for different parties. Was it interesting?

A. Very. Some of the people I worked with were planning to go into politics, or political journalism. It gave one a big insight into the process.

Q. But you didn't think of a political life for yourself?

A. Maybe once or twice. But most of the time, though the work itself was fascinating, I kept thinking: "This would make a good story", or "there's a character for a novel some day." I couldn't help it.

Q. You kept writing?

A. Some articles for The Spectator magazine. Another novel, taken to an agent but not accepted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Lost Island. About 1,000 feet south of the Rockaway shores, off the coast of Queens in New York City, a one mile long island which I make mention of in NEW YORK – called Hog Island - had by the late nineteenth century became a favourite getaway “back room business” gathering spot for some of the city’s most powerful Tamany Hall politicians, and even attracted beach resort businesses and developers. But following the infamous Hurricane of 1893, which made landfall in New York City in August of that year, the island all but disappeared under the sea, and was lost entirely by 1902. Almost a century later, following two particularly devastating storms, hundreds of artifacts from the late nineteenth century washed up on the shores of southern Long Island, believed to have come from Hog Island.




Welcome
Please choose your regional preference: