Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


The Book Trade

Q. Then you went into the book trade.

A. I was just drawn to books: Publishing, bookselling, wherever I could get in. Several interviews didn't lead to any job. Then I met Tim Waterstone, who'd just gone to run a new division of the British bookseller WHSmith, and he offered me a job to join a young team he was forming.

Q. Tim Waterstone is today known as one of Britain's most creative and dynamic entrepreneurs.

A. And he hasn't changed at all. He was a magical boss, and we worked round the clock marketing books. We were based in London, in Soho, right in the heart of the theatre, bookseller, film and red light district. It was a very happy time.

Q. You were out on the road as a salesman for some of this time.

A. Correct. I've carried the salesman's sample bag.

Q. So what did you write about this time?

A. Only an unfinished novella about a book salesman. The trouble with dynamic entrepreneurs is that they make you work so hard you haven't time to write!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
In Manhattan in the early to mid nineteenth century, scores of pigs roamed the streets – about 20,000 of them at peak population in the early 1820’s, a ratio of roughly one pig to every five humans ! Many of them belonged to families. The city was quickly growing in the nineteenth century – in population and wealth disparity. Despite rapid urbanization, non-wealthy New Yorkers continued raising hogs as a means of surviving. A family could always slaughter one of its pigs to feed itself, or sell one of them since pork was a staple of the American diet. Why pigs? Other animals weren’t quite so compatible with urban life. People could let their pigs wander the streets, rummage through trash for the piles of spoiled food that was left out on the street during the day, and count on them to return home in the evening !




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