Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Turned Down

Q. Yet despite that success, your publishers didn't want your next book. They turned your new proposal down.

A. They didn't absolutely refuse to publish, but they were so negative that it was useless to proceed.

Q. Why was that?

A. Publishers are very good at knowing what sold before - and that's highly valuable information. So they want more of the same - and that's usually good business. The movie business is similar. When large owner corporations put relentless demands upon editors, it makes them even more timid and you can't blame them. But in my opinion, an editor needs to think like an automobile manufacturer. Keep improving your existing models and redesign them from time to time. Anyway, in this case I proposed a book that was similar, but also somewhat different to what had gone before, and they were horrified. They wanted no change in treatment at all, and they hated the subject.

Q. Can you tell me the subject?

A. I'd prefer not, because I still hope one day in the future to write the book. I think it's quite an ingenious tale.

Did You Know?
Lost Island. About 1,000 feet south of the Rockaway shores, off the coast of Queens in New York City, a one mile long island which I make mention of in NEW YORK – called Hog Island - had by the late nineteenth century became a favourite getaway “back room business” gathering spot for some of the city’s most powerful Tamany Hall politicians, and even attracted beach resort businesses and developers. But following the infamous Hurricane of 1893, which made landfall in New York City in August of that year, the island all but disappeared under the sea, and was lost entirely by 1902. Almost a century later, following two particularly devastating storms, hundreds of artifacts from the late nineteenth century washed up on the shores of southern Long Island, believed to have come from Hog Island.




Welcome
Please choose your regional preference: