Education


History is the Story Told...

By the victors - so runs the usual saying. But I don't think it's true. There is a story that Stalin was once discussing propaganda with some of his henchmen, who told him that they would squash a rumor he didn't like. Stalin only shook his head sadly and said: "But people will still talk."

It seems to me that history is the story told by the survivors. In other words, the record that we can find. It may be a list of battles carved in stone. It may be the diary of a little girl who did not, personally survive. It may be an artefact dug up by an archeologist, or the thickness of a ring in a tree, or even a tune. The victors may have got lucky; but the survivors, I think, have the last word.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
In Manhattan in the early to mid nineteenth century, scores of pigs roamed the streets – about 20,000 of them at peak population in the early 1820’s, a ratio of roughly one pig to every five humans ! Many of them belonged to families. The city was quickly growing in the nineteenth century – in population and wealth disparity. Despite rapid urbanization, non-wealthy New Yorkers continued raising hogs as a means of surviving. A family could always slaughter one of its pigs to feed itself, or sell one of them since pork was a staple of the American diet. Why pigs? Other animals weren’t quite so compatible with urban life. People could let their pigs wander the streets, rummage through trash for the piles of spoiled food that was left out on the street during the day, and count on them to return home in the evening !




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