Education


History is the Story Told...

By the victors - so runs the usual saying. But I don't think it's true. There is a story that Stalin was once discussing propaganda with some of his henchmen, who told him that they would squash a rumor he didn't like. Stalin only shook his head sadly and said: "But people will still talk."

It seems to me that history is the story told by the survivors. In other words, the record that we can find. It may be a list of battles carved in stone. It may be the diary of a little girl who did not, personally survive. It may be an artefact dug up by an archeologist, or the thickness of a ring in a tree, or even a tune. The victors may have got lucky; but the survivors, I think, have the last word.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
In 1890, nine-year-old Daisy Ashford wrote a novel and never showed it to the world. It was only after her mother’s death some twenty-eight years later, when she was sorting through old papers with her sisters, that she found the manuscript in a drawer. After the manuscript found its way to publishers, the book – The Young Visiters – came out in 1919, (yes, that is how the title was spelled) to great acclaim. After the book went into several editions, Daisy bought a farm with her earnings, commenting, “I like fresh air and royalty cheques”.