Monmouth's Rebellion

After the death of Charles II in 1685, his popular but illegitimate Protestant son, the Duke of Monmouth, raised a rebellion against his Catholic uncle James II that failed and led to Monmouth's capture near the New Forest, his execution, and the 'Bloody Assizes' which included the trial of a well-known Forest lady, Alice Lisle. (See Alice Lisle). A further connection between the New Forest and Monmouth is the fact that Monmouth's descendant, Lord Montagu, owns Beaulieu Abbey there. (See Beaulieu Abbey)




 

 

 

Did You Know?
The first motorist to be fined for speeding in the UK was Walter Arnold in 1896. He was driving 8 miles per hour. At the time the speed limit for motor vehicles was 2 miles per hour!




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