Sackville Street

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This great thoroughfare on the north side of the Liffey in central Dublin is nowadays known as O'Connell Street. But in the days of the Ascendancy it was called Sackville Street, and as such it appears frequently in Rutherfurd's second Irish book, from the 'Ascendancy' chapter onwards. At one time it contained a column supporting a statue of Nelson, but this was blown up. For the time being, a tall spike has been placed in the middle of the street.




 

 

 

Did You Know?
In 1598, Queen Elizabeth ordered a banquet featuring a food source from the new world: potatoes. The royal cooks, having never prepared potatoes before, threw the veggie away and cooked the green part or eye instead, sickening the whole royal court. Elizabeth banned the vegetable. The ban was eventually lifted a few years later when potatoes gained popularity in Spain, France and Italy.




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