Smuggling

The wholesale evasion of customs dues on silk, brandy, lace, tobacco and such staples as tea created a huge black market in eighteenth and early nineteenth century England. No area was more deeply involved than the New Forest. A detailed account of every aspect of this trade, how it was financed and carried out, how every class of society was involved, and the useless attempts of the government to prevent it, form a key part of the 'Albion Park' chapter of THE FOREST.




 

 

 

Did You Know?
In Manhattan in the early to mid nineteenth century, scores of pigs roamed the streets – about 20,000 of them at peak population in the early 1820’s, a ratio of roughly one pig to every five humans ! Many of them belonged to families. The city was quickly growing in the nineteenth century – in population and wealth disparity. Despite rapid urbanization, non-wealthy New Yorkers continued raising hogs as a means of surviving. A family could always slaughter one of its pigs to feed itself, or sell one of them since pork was a staple of the American diet. Why pigs? Other animals weren’t quite so compatible with urban life. People could let their pigs wander the streets, rummage through trash for the piles of spoiled food that was left out on the street during the day, and count on them to return home in the evening !




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