Education


History is the Story Told...

By the victors - so runs the usual saying. But I don't think it's true. There is a story that Stalin was once discussing propaganda with some of his henchmen, who told him that they would squash a rumor he didn't like. Stalin only shook his head sadly and said: "But people will still talk."

It seems to me that history is the story told by the survivors. In other words, the record that we can find. It may be a list of battles carved in stone. It may be the diary of a little girl who did not, personally survive. It may be an artefact dug up by an archeologist, or the thickness of a ring in a tree, or even a tune. The victors may have got lucky; but the survivors, I think, have the last word.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Although many of his most memorable speeches and rallies occurred in the southern United States, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had a huge presence in New York City during the 1950’s and 60’s – he gave many sermons at Riverside Church in Morningside Heights in Manhattan, led an anti-war march from Central Park to the United Nations, and received a Medallion of Honor from Mayor Robert Wagner. Across New York City, he has no less than eight major memorials dedicated to him, from streets to parks to playgrounds to housing and educational centers, and across the US in its entirety, there are approximately 900 streets in his name.