Monmouth's Rebellion

After the death of Charles II in 1685, his popular but illegitimate Protestant son, the Duke of Monmouth, raised a rebellion against his Catholic uncle James II that failed and led to Monmouth's capture near the New Forest, his execution, and the 'Bloody Assizes' which included the trial of a well-known Forest lady, Alice Lisle. (See Alice Lisle). A further connection between the New Forest and Monmouth is the fact that Monmouth's descendant, Lord Montagu, owns Beaulieu Abbey there. (See Beaulieu Abbey)




 

 

 

Did You Know?
Only one man was allowed to live in the royal palace of China, known as the Forbidden City: the emperor. All the other inhabitants were either women - wives, concubines or servants - or the famous palace eunuchs. Nearly all eunuchs were castrated when they were still only boys. But there were just a few who chose to be castrated after they became men, and even had children of their own. They did it for the money. 




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