Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Life Now

Q. Would you say you have an exciting life?

A. Depends what you mean. I don't hang out with famous people, literary or otherwise. No visits to war zones. Hemingway ran with the bulls at Pamplona, but I thought I'd leave that until I'm older. So apart from a fair amount of travel, and happy times spent with my kids, wider family and friends I'm usually to be found in a library or sitting quietly at a desk - pacing about the room, actually. A typical author, I suppose. But is that exciting? Yes. So is the life of the ordinary man taking the commuter train to the office and returning to his wife and kids in the evening. So is the single librarian who reads a lot and lives with her mother. The greatest spiritual heights and richest emotions may be experienced in the quietest lifestyles. I'm fortunate though, because I love my work. Many people don't.

Q. Do you read much?

A. Mostly for research. Also for relaxation; Grisham, Sheldon, that sort of thing. Sheldon's The Other Side of Midnight is one of the most perfectly constructed novels I ever read.

Q. What are you working on at present?

A. I've six or seven books in preparation. I'll just have to hope that in due course, my publishers will want to publish one of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Although many of his most memorable speeches and rallies occurred in the southern United States, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. had a huge presence in New York City during the 1950’s and 60’s – he gave many sermons at Riverside Church in Morningside Heights in Manhattan, led an anti-war march from Central Park to the United Nations, and received a Medallion of Honor from Mayor Robert Wagner. Across New York City, he has no less than eight major memorials dedicated to him, from streets to parks to playgrounds to housing and educational centers, and across the US in its entirety, there are approximately 900 streets in his name.




Welcome
Please choose your regional preference: