Rutherfurd on Rutherfurd


Politics

Q. But then you were unexpectedly offered a job.

A. My tutor at Cambridge had heard about a job in political research and recommended me without my knowledge. Suddenly, stuck in the middle of Chapter Seven, I get a letter asking me to an interview.

Q. And they offered you a job. Had you taken an interest in politics before?

A. Not really. But it took me right into the centre of the political system. A wonderful opportunity. So I figured I'd try it, and work on the book at week-ends.

Q. You did two research jobs in fact, for different parties. Was it interesting?

A. Very. Some of the people I worked with were planning to go into politics, or political journalism. It gave one a big insight into the process.

Q. But you didn't think of a political life for yourself?

A. Maybe once or twice. But most of the time, though the work itself was fascinating, I kept thinking: "This would make a good story", or "there's a character for a novel some day." I couldn't help it.

Q. You kept writing?

A. Some articles for The Spectator magazine. Another novel, taken to an agent but not accepted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did You Know?
Only one man was allowed to live in the royal palace of China, known as the Forbidden City: the emperor. All the other inhabitants were either women - wives, concubines or servants - or the famous palace eunuchs. Nearly all eunuchs were castrated when they were still only boys. But there were just a few who chose to be castrated after they became men, and even had children of their own. They did it for the money. 




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